Tapis Persans 140cm Twill Hermes Shawl

Tapis Persans 140cm Twill Hermes Shawl

$799.00

Tapis Persans 140cm Twill Hermes Shawl – unworn pristine condition – no issues or flaws or damage – modeling shots to come – box available

Hermes writes: The history of Persian carpets dates back thousands of years, beginning with the nomadic peoples of the steppes of central Asia. The knotted carpets were designed to protect them against the cold, and hung as draught-proof partitions inside their tents. The oldest surviving example – the celebrated Pazryk carpet from the Altai mountains (4th century BCE) – is an eloquent testament to its creators’ aesthetic sensibility. The secrets of carpet-making are handed down from generation to generation. Each motif is attributable to a specific, geographic place of origin.Persian rugs became enormously popular in Europe from the 13th century onwards. They were used to cover tables and chests, and as wall hangings. Some came to be named for the painters who depicted them in their work: the distinctive, so-called Lotto carpets, with their dark red ground and bold arabesque designs, are named for the artist Lorenzo Lotto (1480-1556). This carré presents a particularly fine example, inspired by a prayer rug from northern India. The Moghul empire brought Persian influences to the Indian subcontinent – in particular a refined sense of naturalism. Other decorative styles came too, reflected in the diverse motifs seen in this sumptuous, sophisticated carré. Artist Pierre-Marie has taken inspiration from rugs like these, and the superb Indian archives at the Museum of Textile Printing in Mulhouse, France. Designed by Pierre-Marie

Out of stock

Description

Tapis Persans 140cm Twill Hermes Shawl – unworn pristine condition – no issues or flaws or damage – modeling shots to come – box available Hermes writes: The history of Persian carpets dates back thousands of years, beginning with the nomadic peoples of the steppes of central Asia. The knotted carpets were designed to protect them against the cold, and hung as draught-proof partitions inside their tents. The oldest surviving example – the celebrated Pazryk carpet from the Altai mountains (4th century BCE) – is an eloquent testament to its creators’ aesthetic sensibility. The secrets of carpet-making are handed down from generation to generation. Each motif is attributable to a specific, geographic place of origin.Persian rugs became enormously popular in Europe from the 13th century onwards. They were used to cover tables and chests, and as wall hangings. Some came to be named for the painters who depicted them in their work: the distinctive, so-called Lotto carpets, with their dark red ground and bold arabesque designs, are named for the artist Lorenzo Lotto (1480-1556). This carré presents a particularly fine example, inspired by a prayer rug from northern India. The Moghul empire brought Persian influences to the Indian subcontinent – in particular a refined sense of naturalism. Other decorative styles came too, reflected in the diverse motifs seen in this sumptuous, sophisticated carré. Artist Pierre-Marie has taken inspiration from rugs like these, and the superb Indian archives at the Museum of Textile Printing in Mulhouse, France. Designed by Pierre-Marie. The Hermes scarf – a 90 cm silk square weighing approximately 65 grams – has graced the necks of the world’s outstanding ladies and continues to be an indispensable accessory for all elegant women. Manufacturing methods may have evolved since the first scarf was turned out in 1937, but high-quality traditional craftsmanship remains the standard. The factory is situated in Pierre-Benite, near Lyon, the capital of silk. In the printing department, bolts of silk are fixed on immense tables more than 100 meters long. A printer places a silk screen frame corresponding to one color and one particular design and applies the appropriate dye. These steps are repeated as many times as the number of frames needed to arrive at the final pattern. Depending on its complexity, 24 to 70 applications may be required. Once it is printed, the bank of silk is put to dry above the tables for the entire day. Later it is washed, dried, ironed and cut. A seamstress puts the finishing touch with a hand-sewn hem on the scarf’s four borders. The colors employed call for a variety of utensils worthy of a great chef. The assemblage of pigments under neat allows for the composition of 38 primary colors which, skillfully mixed, produce an infinite range of hues and shades. Hermes creates new patterns based on a specific theme every year. More than 1000 different models exist, each one conjugated in a dozen colors. Click here to request access to the It’s-All-Goode Vintage Hermes Scarf Database. It’s All Goode specializes in vintage Hermès treasures, primarily Hermès silk scarves and Hermès cashmere shawls. Many of our Hermès scarves and shawls are in unworn, pristine condition. All items are consigned to It’s All Goode or come from my own collection. It’s All Goode does not shop Hermès sales or the internet for marked-up resale of vintage Hermès scarves.